Nesting biology of tropical solitary and social sweat bees,Lasioglossum (Dialictus) figueresi Wcislo andL. (D.) aeneiventre (Friese) (Hymenoptera: Halictidae)

@article{Wcislo1993NestingBO,
  title={Nesting biology of tropical solitary and social sweat bees,Lasioglossum (Dialictus) figueresi Wcislo andL. (D.) aeneiventre (Friese) (Hymenoptera: Halictidae)},
  author={William T. Wcislo and Alvaro Wille and Enrique Orozco},
  journal={Insectes Sociaux},
  year={1993},
  volume={40},
  pages={21-40}
}
SummaryThe nesting biology of a mainly solitary bee,Lasioglossum (Dialictus) figueresi, is compared with that of a possible relative and mainly eusocial bee,L. (D.) aeneiventre. These bees nest in the ground in highly disturbed areas in the Meseta Central of Costa Rica. Information is provided on social organization, male production, diel and seasonal activity patterns, pollen utilization, natural enemies and nest architecture. L. (D.) figueresi nests within aggregations in vertical earthen… 

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