Nesting Sites of the Eastern Indigo Snake (Drymarchon couperi) in Georgia

@article{Stevenson2021NestingSO,
  title={Nesting Sites of the Eastern Indigo Snake (Drymarchon couperi) in Georgia},
  author={Dirk J. Stevenson and Natalie L. Hyslop and C. R. Layton and James Godlewski and Frankie H. Snow},
  journal={Southeastern Naturalist},
  year={2021},
  volume={20},
  pages={345 - 352}
}
Abstract Little is known about the nesting habits of Drymarchon couperi (Eastern Indigo Snake), a federally threatened species native to the Coastal Plain of the southeastern United States. Here, we describe locations of nest sites based on reports in the literature and from our field observations of putative nests and hatched eggshells. All wild nest sites (n = 7) known for the species (i.e., excluding those from translocated and/or captive-bred snakes) have been found in xeric sandhill… 

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