Nest structure and populations ofMyrmecia (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), with observations on the capture of prey

@article{Gray2005NestSA,
  title={Nest structure and populations ofMyrmecia (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), with observations on the capture of prey},
  author={B. Gray},
  journal={Insectes Sociaux},
  year={2005},
  volume={21},
  pages={107-120}
}
  • B. Gray
  • Published 1 March 1974
  • Environmental Science
  • Insectes Sociaux
SummaryThe queen makes a very simple nest structure which appears to be a common design for mostMyrmecia species. However, after the appearance of the first workers the nest structure changes slowly as the colony grows larger to one typical of the species. Although many species, if not all, have a typical nest structure, two basic designs appear evident in theMyrmecia. The first is a simple structure with normally one main shaft, and little or no mound, while the second is a more diffuse and… 

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Abstract Ants may compose a large portion of the total biomass in an ecosystem and can play a significant role in soil turnover and nutrient cycling. Monitoring ant nest architecture and growth in

MODIFICATIONS OF FINE- AND COARSE-TEXTURED SOIL MATERIAL CAUSED BY THE ANT FORMICA SUBSERICEA

The majority of ant-related bioturbation research has focused on physiochemical properties of the nest mound. However, ants are also known to line subsurface nest components (chambers and galleries)

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