Nest site attributes and temporal patterns of northern flicker nest loss: effects of predation and competition

@article{Fisher2005NestSA,
  title={Nest site attributes and temporal patterns of northern flicker nest loss: effects of predation and competition},
  author={Ryan Fisher and Karen L. Wiebe},
  journal={Oecologia},
  year={2005},
  volume={147},
  pages={744-753}
}
To date, most studies of nest site selection have failed to take into account more than one source of nest loss (or have combined all sources in one analysis) when examining nest site characteristics, leaving us with an incomplete understanding of the potential trade-offs that individuals may face when selecting a nest site. Our objectives were to determine whether northern flickers (Colaptes auratus) may experience a trade-off in nest site selection in response to mammalian nest predation and… Expand
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