Nest-plugging: interference competition in desert ants (Novomessor cockerelli and Pogonomyrmex barbatus)

@article{Gordon2004NestpluggingIC,
  title={Nest-plugging: interference competition in desert ants (Novomessor cockerelli and Pogonomyrmex barbatus)},
  author={Deborah M. Gordon},
  journal={Oecologia},
  year={2004},
  volume={75},
  pages={114-118}
}
  • D. Gordon
  • Published 2004
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Oecologia
SummaryPogonomyrmex barbatus and Novomessor cockerelli, sympatric species of harvester ants in the Lower Sonoran desert, compete for seed resources. This study reports on a method of interference competition. Early in the morning, before P. barbatus' activity period, N. cockerelli fills the nest entrances of P. barbatus with sand. This delays the beginning of the P. barbatus activity period for 1–3 h. P. barbatus colonies near N. cockerelli nests were more likely to be plugged. Nest-plugging… Expand
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