Nest attendance of lactating females in a wild house mouse population: benefits associated with communal nesting

@article{Auclair2014NestAO,
  title={Nest attendance of lactating females in a wild house mouse population: benefits associated with communal nesting},
  author={Yannick Auclair and Barbara K{\"o}nig and Manuela Ferrari and Nicolas Perony and Anna K Lindholm},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2014},
  volume={92},
  pages={143-149}
}
Among species providing uniparental care, the caring parent faces time constraints and may have to compromise offspring care/protection for self-maintenance. In most mammalian species females raise their offspring without receiving help from males. Communal nesting, when multiple females share a single nest where they rear their pups together, may have evolved as a mutually beneficial cooperative behaviour to reduce mothers' nest attendance without increasing the time their offspring are left… CONTINUE READING
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A Selfish Genetic Element Influencing Longevity Correlates with Reactive Behavioural Traits in Female House Mice (Mus domesticus)

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