Nest- and colony-mate recognition in polydomous colonies of meat ants (Iridomyrmex purpureus)

@article{Wilgenburg2006NestAC,
  title={Nest- and colony-mate recognition in polydomous colonies of meat ants (Iridomyrmex purpureus)},
  author={Ellen van Wilgenburg and Danielle Ryan and Patricia Morrison and Philip John Marriott and Mark A. Elgar},
  journal={Naturwissenschaften},
  year={2006},
  volume={93},
  pages={309-314}
}
Workers of polydomous colonies of social insects must recognize not only colony-mates residing in the same nest but also those living in other nests. We investigated the impact of a decentralized colony structure on colony- and nestmate recognition in the polydomous Australian meat ant (Iridomyrmex purpureus). Field experiments showed that ants of colonies with many nests were less aggressive toward alien conspecifics than those of colonies with few nests. In addition, while meat ants were… Expand

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