Nervous system of ascidian larvae: Caudal primary sensory neurons

@article{Torrence2004NervousSO,
  title={Nervous system of ascidian larvae: Caudal primary sensory neurons},
  author={Steven A. Torrence and Richard A. Cloney},
  journal={Zoomorphology},
  year={2004},
  volume={99},
  pages={103-115}
}
SummaryIn larvae of Diplosoma macdonaldi one sensory nerve extends along the dorsal midline of the tail and another extends along the ventral midline. Each nerve is composed of 50–70 naked axons lying in a groove in the base of the epidermis, and each projects to the visceral ganglion. The cell bodies of the caudal sensory neurons occur in pairs within the epidermis, and are situated along the courses of the nerves. A single cilium arises from an invagination in the soma of each neuron, passes… 
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