Neptune's capture of its moon Triton in a binary–planet gravitational encounter

@article{Agnor2006NeptunesCO,
  title={Neptune's capture of its moon Triton in a binary–planet gravitational encounter},
  author={C. Agnor and D. Hamilton},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2006},
  volume={441},
  pages={192-194}
}
Triton is Neptune's principal satellite and is by far the largest retrograde satellite in the Solar System (its mass is ∼40 per cent greater than that of Pluto). Its inclined and circular orbit lies between a group of small inner prograde satellites and a number of exterior irregular satellites with both prograde and retrograde orbits. This unusual configuration has led to the belief that Triton originally orbited the Sun before being captured in orbit around Neptune. Existing models for its… Expand

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