Neonatal oxygen increases sensitivity to influenza A virus infection in adult mice by suppressing epithelial expression of Ear1.

@article{Oreilly2012NeonatalOI,
  title={Neonatal oxygen increases sensitivity to influenza A virus infection in adult mice by suppressing epithelial expression of Ear1.},
  author={Michael A O'reilly and Min Yee and Bradley W Buczynski and Peter F Vitiello and Peter C. Keng and Stephen Welle and Jacob N. Finkelstein and David A. Dean and B. Paige Lawrence},
  journal={The American journal of pathology},
  year={2012},
  volume={181 2},
  pages={441-51}
}
Oxygen exposure in premature infants is a major risk factor for bronchopulmonary dysplasia and can impair the host response to respiratory viral infections later in life. Similarly, adult mice exposed to hyperoxia as neonates display alveolar simplification associated with a reduced number of alveolar epithelial type II cells and exhibit persistent inflammation, fibrosis, and mortality when infected with influenza A virus. Because type II cells participate in innate immunity and alveolar repair… CONTINUE READING
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American journal of physiology. Lung cellular and molecular physiology • 2015

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