Neonatal nucleated red blood cell count and postpartum complications in growth restricted fetuses

@inproceedings{Baschat2003NeonatalNR,
  title={Neonatal nucleated red blood cell count and postpartum complications in growth restricted fetuses},
  author={Ahmet A Baschat and Ulrich Gembruch and Irwin Reiss and Ludwig Gortner and Christopher Harman},
  booktitle={Journal of perinatal medicine},
  year={2003}
}
Abstract Aims: To study relationships between nucleated red blood cell count (NRBC), persistence of NRBC count elevation and neonatal complications in growth restricted fetuses (IUGR). Methods: Observational study of IUGR neonates (birthweight < 10th percentile). NRBC's/100 WBC were ascertained in a peripheral blood sample. Subsequent daily samples were analyzed until NRBC's fell < 10/100 WBC. NRBC count and days of NRBC elevation were related to complications (respiratory distress syndrome… Expand
Nucleated red blood cell counts in the first week of life: a critical appraisal of relationships with perinatal outcome in preterm growth-restricted neonates.
TLDR
The importance of prematurity and growth are emphasized, but elevatedNRBC counts beyond day 3 are relevant independent predictors of adverse outcome, and simple daily NRBC counts provide clinical information that is equivalent to more complicated methods. Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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Sustained hematological consequences in the first week of neonatal life secondary to placental dysfunction.
TLDR
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TLDR
A significant positive or negative correlation between nucleated red blood cell, platelet and white blood cell counts, and Doppler indices suggests an association between placental insufficiency and the fetal hematological response. Expand
Effect of maternal obesity and passive smoking on neonatal nucleated red blood cells
TLDR
The results reveal that neonates of obese mothers and passive maternal smoking have increased NRBCs at birth, and maternal body mass index and infant birth weight were significantly higher in group I. Expand
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