Neolithic patrilineal signals indicate that the Armenian plateau was repopulated by agriculturalists

@article{Herrera2012NeolithicPS,
  title={Neolithic patrilineal signals indicate that the Armenian plateau was repopulated by agriculturalists},
  author={Kristian J. Herrera and Robert K Lowery and Laura Hadden and Silvia Calderon and Carolina Chiou and Levon Yepiskoposyan and Mar{\'i}a Regueiro and Peter A. Underhill and Rene J Herrera},
  journal={European Journal of Human Genetics},
  year={2012},
  volume={20},
  pages={313-320}
}
Armenia, situated between the Black and Caspian Seas, lies at the junction of Turkey, Iran, Georgia, Azerbaijan and former Mesopotamia. This geographic position made it a potential contact zone between Eastern and Western civilizations. In this investigation, we assess Y-chromosomal diversity in four geographically distinct populations that represent the extent of historical Armenia. We find a striking prominence of haplogroups previously implicated with the Agricultural Revolution in the Near… 
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