Neocortex size predicts deception rate in primates

@article{Byrne2004NeocortexSP,
  title={Neocortex size predicts deception rate in primates},
  author={Richard W. Byrne and Nadia Corp},
  journal={Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences},
  year={2004},
  volume={271},
  pages={1693 - 1699}
}
  • R. Byrne, N. Corp
  • Published 22 August 2004
  • Biology, Psychology
  • Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences
Human brain organization is built upon a more ancient adaptation, the large brain of simian primates: on average, monkeys and apes have brains twice as large as expected for mammals of their size, principally as a result of neocortical enlargement. Testing the adaptive benefit of this evolutionary specialization depends on finding an association between brain size and function in primates. However, most cognitive capacities have been assessed in only a restricted range of species under… 

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