Negligible senescence in the longest living rodent, the naked mole-rat: insights from a successfully aging species

@article{Buffenstein2007NegligibleSI,
  title={Negligible senescence in the longest living rodent, the naked mole-rat: insights from a successfully aging species},
  author={Rochelle Buffenstein},
  journal={Journal of Comparative Physiology B},
  year={2007},
  volume={178},
  pages={439-445}
}
  • R. Buffenstein
  • Published 8 January 2008
  • Biology
  • Journal of Comparative Physiology B
Aging refers to a gradual deterioration in function that, over time, leads to increased mortality risk, and declining fertility. [] Key Result They maintain body composition from 2 to 24 years, and show only slight age-related changes in all physiological and morphological characteristics studied to date. Surprisingly breeding females show no decline in fertility even when well into their third decade of life. Moreover, these animals have never been observed to develop any spontaneous neoplasm. As such they…

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