Negative impact of traffic noise on avian reproductive success

@article{Halfwerk2011NegativeIO,
  title={Negative impact of traffic noise on avian reproductive success},
  author={W. Halfwerk and Leonard J. M. Holleman and C. M. Lessells and H. Slabbekoorn},
  journal={Journal of Applied Ecology},
  year={2011},
  volume={48},
  pages={210-219}
}
1. Traffic affects large areas of natural habitat worldwide. As a result, the acoustic signals used by birds and other animals are increasingly masked by traffic noise. Masking of signals important to territory defence and mate attraction may have a negative impact on reproductive success. Depending on the overlap in space, time and frequency between noise and vocalizations, such impact may ultimately exclude species from suitable breeding habitat. However a direct impact of traffic noise on… Expand

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