Negative genetic correlation between male sexual attractiveness and survival

@article{Brooks2000NegativeGC,
  title={Negative genetic correlation between male sexual attractiveness and survival},
  author={Robert C. Brooks},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2000},
  volume={406},
  pages={67-70}
}
  • R. Brooks
  • Published 6 July 2000
  • Psychology, Biology
  • Nature
Indirect selection of female mating preferences may result from a genetic association between male attractiveness and offspring fitness. The offspring of attractive males may have enhanced growth, fecundity, viability or attractiveness. However, the extent to which attractive males bear genes that reduce other fitness components has remained unexplored. Here I show that sexual attractiveness in male guppies (Poecilia reticulata) is heritable and genetically correlated with ornamentation. Like… 
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Evolutionary consequences and fitness correlates of extra-pair mating in the tūī, Prosthemadera novaeseelandiae
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The influence of sexual selection on the evolution of reproductive behaviours and male secondary sexual characters is investigated in the New Zealand tūī, Prosthemadera novaeseelandiae to examine correlates and fitness consequences of female within-pair and extra-pair mate choice.
DIRECT AND INDIRECT SEXUAL SELECTION AND QUANTITATIVE GENETICS OF MALE TRAITS IN GUPPIES (POECILIA RETICULATA)
TLDR
It is predicted that indirect selection may have important effects on the evolution of male guppy color patterns and that attractiveness and mating success as measures of fitness are positively correlated at the phenotypic and genetic level.
DIRECT AND INDIRECT SEXUAL SELECTION AND QUANTITATIVE GENETICS OF MALE TRAITS IN GUPPIES (POECILIA RETICULATA)
  • R. Brooks, J. Endler
  • Psychology, Biology
    Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
  • 2001
TLDR
It is predicted that indirect selection may have important effects on the evolution of male guppy color patterns and that Attractiveness and mating success are positively correlated at the phenotypic and genetic level.
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