Nectar robbing, forager efficiency and seed set : Bumblebees foraging on the self incompatible plant Linaria vulgaris (Scrophulariaceae)

@article{Stout2000NectarRF,
  title={Nectar robbing, forager efficiency and seed set : Bumblebees foraging on the self incompatible plant Linaria vulgaris (Scrophulariaceae)},
  author={J C Stout and John A. Allen and Dave Goulson},
  journal={Acta Oecologica-international Journal of Ecology},
  year={2000},
  volume={21},
  pages={277-283}
}

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  • Biology, Medicine
    American journal of botany
  • 2001
TLDR
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