Neanderthal self-medication in context

@article{Hardy2013NeanderthalSI,
  title={Neanderthal self-medication in context},
  author={K. Hardy and S. Buckley and M. Huffman},
  journal={Antiquity},
  year={2013},
  volume={87},
  pages={873 - 878}
}
In a recent study, Hardy et al. (2012) identified compounds from two non-nutritional plants, yarrow and camomile, in a sample of Neanderthal dental calculus from the northern Spanish site of El Sidrón. Both these plants are bitter tasting and have little nutritional value but are well known for their medicinal qualities. Bitter taste can signal poison. We know that the bitter taste perception gene TAS2R38 was present among the Neanderthals of El Sidrón (Lalueza-Fox et al. 2009), and their… Expand
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