Neanderthal brain size at birth provides insights into the evolution of human life history

@article{PoncedeLen2008NeanderthalBS,
  title={Neanderthal brain size at birth provides insights into the evolution of human life history},
  author={Marcia S. Ponce de Le{\'o}n and Lubov Golovanova and Vladimir Doronichev and Galina I. Romanova and Takeru Akazawa and Osamu Kondo and Hajime Ishida and Christoph P. E. Zollikofer},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences},
  year={2008},
  volume={105},
  pages={13764 - 13768}
}
From birth to adulthood, the human brain expands by a factor of 3.3, compared with 2.5 in chimpanzees [DeSilva J and Lesnik J (2006) Chimpanzee neonatal brain size: Implications for brain growth in Homo erectus. J Hum Evol 51: 207–212]. How the required extra amount of human brain growth is achieved and what its implications are for human life history and cognitive development are still a matter of debate. Likewise, because comparative fossil evidence is scarce, when and how the modern human… 

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