Neanderthal behaviour, diet, and disease inferred from ancient DNA in dental calculus

@article{Weyrich2017NeanderthalBD,
  title={Neanderthal behaviour, diet, and disease inferred from ancient DNA in dental calculus},
  author={Laura S. Weyrich and Sebasti{\'a}n Duch{\^e}ne and Julien Soubrier and Luis A. Arriola and Bastien Llamas and James Breen and Alan G. Morris and Kurt W. Alt and David Caramelli and Veit Dresely and Milly Farrell and Andrew G. Farrer and Michael Francken and Neville J Gully and Wolfgang Haak and Karen Hardy and Katerina Harvati and Petra Held and Edward C. Holmes and John A. Kaidonis and Carles Lalueza-Fox and Marco de la Rasilla and Antonio Rosas and Patrick Semal and Arkadiusz Sołtysiak and Grant Townsend and Donatella Usai and Joachim Wahl and Daniel H. Huson and Keith M. Dobney and Alan Cooper},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2017},
  volume={544},
  pages={357-361}
}
Recent genomic data have revealed multiple interactions between Neanderthals and modern humans, but there is currently little genetic evidence regarding Neanderthal behaviour, diet, or disease. Here we describe the shotgun-sequencing of ancient DNA from five specimens of Neanderthal calcified dental plaque (calculus) and the characterization of regional differences in Neanderthal ecology. At Spy cave, Belgium, Neanderthal diet was heavily meat based and included woolly rhinoceros and wild sheep… 

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