Neandertal DNA Sequences and the Origin of Modern Humans

@article{Krings1997NeandertalDS,
  title={Neandertal DNA Sequences and the Origin of Modern Humans},
  author={Matthias Krings and Anne C. Stone and Ralf W. Schmitz and Heike Krainitzki and Mark Stoneking and Svante P{\"a}{\"a}bo},
  journal={Cell},
  year={1997},
  volume={90},
  pages={19-30}
}

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