Nature's chemicals and synthetic chemicals: comparative toxicology.

@article{Ames1990NaturesCA,
  title={Nature's chemicals and synthetic chemicals: comparative toxicology.},
  author={Bruce N. Ames and Margie Profet and Lois Swirsky Gold},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
  year={1990},
  volume={87},
  pages={7782 - 7786}
}
  • B. AmesM. ProfetL. Gold
  • Published 1 October 1990
  • Chemistry
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
The toxicology of synthetic chemicals is compared to that of natural chemicals, which represent the vast bulk of the chemicals to which humans are exposed. It is argued that animals have a broad array of inducible general defenses to combat the changing array of toxic chemicals in plant food (nature's pesticides) and that these defenses are effective against both natural and synthetic toxins. Synthetic toxins such as dioxin are compared to natural chemicals, such as indole carbinol (in broccoli… 

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