Naturally occurring Toll-like receptor 11 (TLR11) and Toll-like receptor 12 (TLR12) polymorphisms are not associated with Toxoplasma gondii infection in wild wood mice.

@article{Morger2014NaturallyOT,
  title={Naturally occurring Toll-like receptor 11 (TLR11) and Toll-like receptor 12 (TLR12) polymorphisms are not associated with Toxoplasma gondii infection in wild wood mice.},
  author={Jennifer Morger and Jaroslav Bajnok and Kellyanne Boyce and Philip Simon Craig and M T Rogan and Zhao-rong Lun and Geoff Hide and Barbara Tschirren},
  journal={Infection, genetics and evolution : journal of molecular epidemiology and evolutionary genetics in infectious diseases},
  year={2014},
  volume={26},
  pages={180-4}
}
Toxoplasma gondii is a highly successful parasite with a worldwide prevalence. Small rodents are the main intermediate hosts, and there is growing evidence that T. gondii modifies their behaviour. Chronically infected rodents show impaired learning capacity, enhanced activity, and, most importantly, a reduction of the innate fear towards cat odour. This modification of host behaviour ensures a successful transmission of T. gondii from rodents to felids, the definitive hosts of the parasite… CONTINUE READING
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