Naturalist Law and Japan's Legitimization of Empire in Manchuria: Thomas Baty and Japan's Ministry of Foreign Affairs

@article{Oblas2004NaturalistLA,
  title={Naturalist Law and Japan's Legitimization of Empire in Manchuria: Thomas Baty and Japan's Ministry of Foreign Affairs},
  author={Peter B. Oblas},
  journal={Diplomacy \& Statecraft},
  year={2004},
  volume={15},
  pages={35 - 55}
}
Thomas Baty (1869–1954), a prolific, British international law scholar, achieved prominence in diplomatic affairs by serving as Japan's Foreign Legal Adviser in the years spanning two world wars. Baty's advice to the Japanese government was rooted in the non-mainstream natural law philosophy of international legal theory. Baty's law became the defence of the Japanese government before the League of Nations with Japan's occupation of Manchuria in the early 1930s. Baty contended that China's… 
1 Citations
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Although Manchukuo is easily dismissed as a puppet of Japan, at the time of its founding, it was one of many examples of a partially sovereign state. Specific compromises of Manchukuo's sovereignty

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