Natural selection on gene order in the genome reorganization process after whole-genome duplication of yeast.

@article{Sugino2012NaturalSO,
  title={Natural selection on gene order in the genome reorganization process after whole-genome duplication of yeast.},
  author={R. Sugino and Hideki Innan},
  journal={Molecular biology and evolution},
  year={2012},
  volume={29 1},
  pages={
          71-9
        }
}
A genome must locate its coding genes on the chromosomes in a meaningful manner with the help of natural selection, but the mechanism of gene order evolution is poorly understood. To explore the role of selection in shaping the current order of coding genes and their cis-regulatory elements, a comparative genomic approach was applied to the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its close relatives. S. cerevisiae have experienced a whole-genome duplication followed by an extensive… 

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