Natural selection has driven population differentiation in modern humans

@article{Barreiro2008NaturalSH,
  title={Natural selection has driven population differentiation in modern humans},
  author={Luis B. Barreiro and Guillaume Laval and H{\'e}l{\`e}ne Quach and Etienne Patin and Llu{\'i}s Quintana-Murci},
  journal={Nature Genetics},
  year={2008},
  volume={40},
  pages={340-345}
}
The considerable range of observed phenotypic variation in human populations may reflect, in part, distinctive processes of natural selection and adaptation to variable environmental conditions. Although recent genome-wide studies have identified candidate regions under selection, it is not yet clear how natural selection has shaped population differentiation. Here, we have analyzed the degree of population differentiation at 2.8 million Phase II HapMap single-nucleotide polymorphisms. We find… 
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