Natural selection and sex differences in morbidity and mortality in early life.

@article{Wells2000NaturalSA,
  title={Natural selection and sex differences in morbidity and mortality in early life.},
  author={J. Wells},
  journal={Journal of theoretical biology},
  year={2000},
  volume={202 1},
  pages={
          65-76
        }
}
  • J. Wells
  • Published 2000
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of theoretical biology
Both morbidity and mortality are consistently reported to be higher in males than in females in early life, but no explanation for these findings has been offered. This paper argues that the sex difference in early vulnerability can be attributed to the natural selection of optimal maternal strategies for maximizing lifetime reproductive success, as modelled previously by Trivers and Willard. These authors theorized that males and females offer different returns on parental investment depending… Expand
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