• Corpus ID: 46419861

Natural products and their application to the control of head lice: an evidence-based review

@inproceedings{Heukelbach2006NaturalPA,
  title={Natural products and their application to the control of head lice: an evidence-based review},
  author={Jorg Heukelbach and Richard Speare and Deon V. Canyon},
  year={2006}
}
Head lice are insects that have been parasitizing human beings for thousands of years. Chemical pediculicides have been used extensively for the treatment of infestations since the early 20th century. Resistance to these pediculicides, such as permethrin, is constantly increasing and there is a need for the development of new effective compounds killing adult lice and eggs. Natural products have been used in traditional medicine since long ago and have been more and more an issue of interest… 

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