Natural language and natural selection

@article{Pinker1990NaturalLA,
  title={Natural language and natural selection},
  author={Steven Pinker and Paula Jorde Bloom},
  journal={Behavioral and Brain Sciences},
  year={1990},
  volume={13},
  pages={707 - 727}
}
Abstract Many people have argued that the evolution of the human language faculty cannot be explained by Darwinian natural selection. Chomsky and Gould have suggested that language may have evolved as the by-product of selection for other abilities or as a consequence of as-yet unknown laws of growth and form. Others have argued that a biological specialization for grammar is incompatible with every tenet of Darwinian theory – that it shows no genetic variation, could not exist in any… 

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