Natural history and clinical outcome measures for multiple sclerosis studies.¶Why at the present time does EDSS scale remain a preferred outcome measure to evaluate disease evolution?

Abstract

If one person can be considered the founder of modern clinical neurology, it would be Jean-Martin Charcot. His lectures at la Salpêtrière on diseases of the nervous system were given from 1866 to 1880. His illustrations of the spinal cord in multiple sclerosis (MS) show the high proportion of white matter involved by the lesions which are “scattered in time and space.” Thus, the major pathology in MS is concentrated in the neural tube. The principal clinical deficits in MS then would be the result of lesions in the spinal cord and brain stem, with multiple lesions along the neural pathways required for impairment of function. Therefore, the predominant involvement of long tracts would most often be reflected in the lower limbs, and bilaterally. J.F. Kurtzke

DOI: 10.1007/s100720070047
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@article{Kurtzke2000NaturalHA, title={Natural history and clinical outcome measures for multiple sclerosis studies.¶Why at the present time does EDSS scale remain a preferred outcome measure to evaluate disease evolution?}, author={J. F. Kurtzke}, journal={Neurological Sciences}, year={2000}, volume={21}, pages={339-341} }