Natural history and behaviour of the primitively eusocial wasp Ropalidia marginata (Hymenoptera: Vespidae): a comparison of the two sexes

@article{Sen2010NaturalHA,
  title={Natural history and behaviour of the primitively eusocial wasp Ropalidia marginata (Hymenoptera: Vespidae): a comparison of the two sexes},
  author={Ruchira Sen and Raghavendra Gadagkar},
  journal={Journal of Natural History},
  year={2010},
  volume={44},
  pages={959 - 968}
}
We report the natural history and behaviour of the primitively eusocial wasp Ropalidia marginata with a special reference to the males. We found that just as nests of this species are found throughout the year, so are the males. Females spend all their life in their nests but males stay in their natal nests only for 1–12 days and leave to lead a nomadic life. Males maintained in the laboratory can live for up to 140 days. Like all eusocial hymenopteran males, R. marginata males also do not… 
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TLDR
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Ropalidia marginata, the most common Indian social wasp, belongs to a crucial stage of social evolution showing no obvious morphological caste differentiation but a behavioural caste differentiation
Males of the social wasp Ropalidia marginata can feed larvae, given an opportunity
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TLDR
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TLDR
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