Natural gas: Should fracking stop?

@article{Howarth2011NaturalGS,
  title={Natural gas: Should fracking stop?},
  author={Robert W. Howarth and Anthony R. Ingraffea and Terry Engelder},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2011},
  volume={477},
  pages={271-275}
}
Extracting gas from shale increases the availability of this resource, but the health and environmental risks may be too high. 

Topics from this paper

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