Natural behavioural biology as a risk factor in carnivore welfare: How analysing species differences could help zoos improve enclosures

@inproceedings{Clubb2007NaturalBB,
  title={Natural behavioural biology as a risk factor in carnivore welfare: How analysing species differences could help zoos improve enclosures},
  author={R. David Clubb and Georgia J. Mason},
  year={2007}
}
In captivity, some species often seem to thrive, while others are often prone to breeding problems, poor health, and repetitive stereotypic behaviour. Within carnivores, for instance, the brown bear, American mink and snow leopard typically adapt well to captivity and show few signs of poor welfare, while the clouded leopard and polar bear are generally hard to breed successfully and/or to prevent from performing abnormal behaviour. Understanding the fundamental source of such differences could… CONTINUE READING
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