Natural Sleep and Its Seasonal Variations in Three Pre-industrial Societies

@article{Yetish2015NaturalSA,
  title={Natural Sleep and Its Seasonal Variations in Three Pre-industrial Societies},
  author={Gandhi Yetish and Hillard S. Kaplan and Michael D. Gurven and Brian M. Wood and Herman Pontzer and Paul R. Manger and Charles L. Wilson and Ronald McGregor and Jerome M. Siegel},
  journal={Current Biology},
  year={2015},
  volume={25},
  pages={2862-2868}
}

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