Natural Pathogens of Laboratory Mice, Rats, and Rabbits and Their Effects on Research

@article{Baker1998NaturalPO,
  title={Natural Pathogens of Laboratory Mice, Rats, and Rabbits and Their Effects on Research},
  author={David G. Baker},
  journal={Clinical Microbiology Reviews},
  year={1998},
  volume={11},
  pages={231 - 266}
}
  • D. G. Baker
  • Published 1 April 1998
  • Biology
  • Clinical Microbiology Reviews
SUMMARY Laboratory mice, rats, and rabbits may harbor a variety of viral, bacterial, parasitic, and fungal agents. Frequently, these organisms cause no overt signs of disease. However, many of the natural pathogens of these laboratory animals may alter host physiology, rendering the host unsuitable for many experimental uses. While the number and prevalence of these pathogens have declined considerably, many still turn up in laboratory animals and represent unwanted variables in research… 
Fungal Diseases in Laboratory Mice
SUSCEPTIBILITY OF MICE INTENDED FOR ESCHERICHIA COLI, PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA, SALMONELLA ENTERITIDIS AND STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS INFECTION
TLDR
While the range and magnitude of infections has decreased in laboratory mice, rats, and rabbits, continued diligence and additional study are required to ensure the wellbeing of animals used in biomedical research.
Helminth parasites of laboratory mice and rats.
TLDR
The fact that many laboratory rodent colonies were found to be parasite contaminated suggests a need for eradication and improvment of the quality of laboratory rodents, and suggests to pay special attention on controlling the sanitary conditions of animal houses.
Future Directions in Rodent Pathogen Control.
TLDR
In this brief presentation, the history of rodent pathogen control is reviewed, a few practical ways in which laboratory animal scientists can further contribute to biomedical research and the betterment of society are suggested by facilitating greater understanding of the effects of microbes on laboratory rodents.
Respiratory Diseases of Rodents and Rabbits
Natural pathogens of laboratory animals and their effects on research.
TLDR
The role of rodents in the evaluation of topical antifungal agents, dermatophytosis and two species of Candida, which are natural pathogens of laboratory animals, are discussed in relation to their effects on research.
A survey on intestinal parasites in Swiss Webster mice
TLDR
Considering the existence of zoonotic parasites in the mice and the interference of these parasites with some studies, it is necessary for those dealing with these animals to attend to the principles of the Good Laboratory Practice (GLP).
A Survey on the Gastrointestinal Parasites of Rabbit and Guinea Pig in a Laboratory Animal House
TLDR
As a research project concerning the diversity and distribution of parasites of rabbit and guinea pig in a conventional laboratory animal house, about 87 rabbits and 105 guinea pigs were selected randomly from a Research, Production & Breeding of Laboratory Animals Department.
A survey of rodent-borne pathogens carried by wild-caught Norway rats: A potential threat to laboratory rodent colonies
TLDR
The risk of pathogen transmission from wild-caught rats to laboratory colonies needs to be mitigated by minimizing exposures rather than assuming wild animals represent a minimal hazard.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 811 REFERENCES
Parvovirus infections of mice and rats
Abstract The recent discovery of new rodent parvoviruses indicate that the properties and effects of these viruses are more diverse than previously thought. They include virus and host-dependent
A review of common infectious disease agents of laboratory mice and rats: potential influence on Pneumocystis carinii.
  • S. Barthold
  • Biology, Medicine
    The Journal of protozoology
  • 1991
TLDR
A number of adventitious viruses and bacteria are common among commercially available and institutionally raised rodents, which may impact upon, or interfere with, the induction of PCP in rodents in several ways.
New isolates of pneumonia virus of mice (PVM) from Japanese rat colonies and their characterization.
Two virus strains were isolated from the lungs of athymic rats and mice used as sentinel animals in 2 colonies of laboratory rats in Japan in which antibodies to the pneumonia virus of mice (PVM) had
Respiratory disease in a colony of rats: I. The natural disease
TLDR
The epidemic showed that severe respiratory disease varying from peracute to chronic was associated with infection of the lungs with aMycoplasma but that mycoplasmas could be present in rats, even in the lungs, without signs of disease, thus suggesting that one or more other factors were involved.
Dietary, bacterial, and host genetic interactions in the pathogenesis of transmissible murine colonic hyperplasia.
Transmissible murine colonic hyperplasia, cuased by a variant of Citrobacter freundii (4280). was shown to be modified by diet and by host strain and species. Four different diets fed to mice
Survey of Pseudomonas aeruginosa contamination in human beings and laboratory animals.
TLDR
Findings demonstrated that the researchers and the animal caretakers were contaminated with P. aeruginosa by the animals, and then became infective vehicles.
CHAPTER 8 – Bacterial Diseases
The mouse peritonitis model: present and future use.
The mouse peritonitis model was the first experimental animal model to be used in antibiotic research in 1935, where it proved the effect of Prontosil and derivative sulphonamides against
Virus zoonoses and their potential for contamination of cell cultures.
TLDR
Rigorous use of barrier precautions may have limited exposure and infection with these filovirus-infected monkeys, but the number of nude mice used in this facilty had increased five-fold in the previous year, possibly explaining the timing of the outbreak.
Yersinia associated arthritis in SHR rats: effect of the microbial status of the host.
TLDR
The results indicate that the microbial load of the host has a profound effect on the susceptibility to experimental arthritis.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...