• Corpus ID: 30340142

Natural Law and Birthright Citizenship in Calvin's Case (1608)

@article{Price1997NaturalLA,
  title={Natural Law and Birthright Citizenship in Calvin's Case (1608)},
  author={Polly J. Price},
  journal={Yale journal of law and the humanities},
  year={1997},
  volume={9},
  pages={2}
}
  • Polly J. Price
  • Published 15 January 1997
  • History, Law
  • Yale journal of law and the humanities
This article examines Calvin's Case (1608), a King's Bench decision about whether a person born in Scotland after the union of the Scottish and English crowns in 1603 was also a subject of England. American judges in the nineteenth century used Coke's report of Calvin's Case to determine questions of US citizenship, and in doing so produced a common law of territorial birthright citizenship. American judges equated the ancient English term "subject" with "citizen," without discussion of the… 
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