Natural History of Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis in Skeletally Mature Patients: A Critical Review

@article{Agabegi2015NaturalHO,
  title={Natural History of Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis in Skeletally Mature Patients: A Critical Review},
  author={Steven S. Agabegi and Namdar Kazemi and P. F. Sturm and Charles T Mehlman},
  journal={Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons},
  year={2015},
  volume={23},
  pages={714–723}
}
The surgical treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is dependent on several factors, including curve type and magnitude, degree of curve progression, skeletal maturity, and other considerations, such as pain and cosmesis. The most common indication for surgery is curve progression. Most authors agree that surgical treatment should be considered in skeletally mature patients with curves >50° because of the risk of progression into adulthood. Furthermore, most authors would agree that… 

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