Native range assessment of classical biological control agents: impact of inundative releases as pre-introduction evaluation

@article{Jenner2009NativeRA,
  title={Native range assessment of classical biological control agents: impact of inundative releases as pre-introduction evaluation},
  author={Wade H. Jenner and Peter G. Mason and Naomi Cappuccino and Ulrich Kuhlmann},
  journal={Bulletin of Entomological Research},
  year={2009},
  volume={100},
  pages={387 - 394}
}
Abstract Diadromus pulchellus Wesmael (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae) is a pupal parasitoid under consideration for introduction into Canada for the control of the invasive leek moth, Acrolepiopsis assectella (Zeller) (Lepidoptera: Acrolepiidae). Since study of the parasitoid outside of quarantine was not permitted in Canada at the time of this project, we assessed its efficacy via field trials in its native range in central Europe. This was done by simulating introductory releases that would… Expand
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ii Acknowledgements ................................................................................................................... iii List of FiguresExpand

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