Native Title Research in Australian Anthropology

@article{Asche2011NativeTR,
  title={Native Title Research in Australian Anthropology},
  author={Wendy Asche and David Trigger 1},
  journal={Anthropological Forum},
  year={2011},
  volume={21},
  pages={219 - 232}
}
Anthropology's involvement with Australian Indigenous people seeking to obtain legal rights, particularly in the context of the Native Title Act, has been subject to considerable critique both within and outside of the academy. The collected papers in this volume provide a constructive case for best approaches in this applied anthropological research, given the apparent constraints of the legal environment and the necessity to retain professional anthropological integrity. Issues of cultural… 

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