Native Americans as active and passive promoters of mast and fruit trees in the eastern USA

@article{Abrams2008NativeAA,
  title={Native Americans as active and passive promoters of mast and fruit trees in the eastern USA},
  author={Marc D. Abrams and Gregory J. Nowacki},
  journal={The Holocene},
  year={2008},
  volume={18},
  pages={1123 - 1137}
}
We reviewed literature in the fields of anthropology, archaeology, ethnobotany, palynology and ecology to try to determine the impacts of Native Americans as active and passive promoters of mast (nuts and acorns) and fruit trees prior to European settlement. Mast was a critical resource for carbohydrates and fat calories and at least 30 tree species and genera were used in the diet of Native Americans, the most important being oak (Quercus), hickory (Carya) and chestnut (Castanea), which… Expand

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