National Sorrow, National Pride: Commemoration of War in Canada, 1918–1945

@article{Thomson1996NationalSN,
  title={National Sorrow, National Pride: Commemoration of War in Canada, 1918–1945},
  author={D. Thomson},
  journal={Journal of Canadian Studies/Revue d'{\'e}tudes canadiennes},
  year={1996},
  volume={30},
  pages={27 - 5}
}
  • D. Thomson
  • Published 1996
  • Sociology
  • Journal of Canadian Studies/Revue d'études canadiennes
Abstract: Following the Great War, a new tradition of commemoration of the war dead developed in Canada. The forms and practices of this new tradition were originally common to all members of the British Empire. However, during the interwar period Canadian commemoration gradually came to reflect an increasingly assertive nationalism, a process which reached its culmination with the unveiling of the Vimy Memorial in 1936. The force behind the perpetuation of Canadian commemoration at this time… Expand
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