National Missile Defense and the Future of U.S. Nuclear Weapons Policy

@article{Glaser2001NationalMD,
  title={National Missile Defense and the Future of U.S. Nuclear Weapons Policy},
  author={Charles L. Glaser and Steve Fetter},
  journal={International Security},
  year={2001},
  volume={26},
  pages={40-92}
}
National Miss ile Defens e If U.S. national missile defense (NMD) were only about countering ballistic missiles deployed by rogue states,1 then whether to deploy limited NMD would be a “normal” national security issue. The military-technical question would concern feasibility: Would the missile defense work against the small missile forces that a few states may eventually deploy? The military-political questions would concern the risks to the United States of being vulnerable to rogue-state… Expand
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