National Identity, Cultural Authority, and the Post-Soviet Blockbuster: Nikita Mikhalkov and Aleksei Balabanov

@article{Larsen2003NationalIC,
  title={National Identity, Cultural Authority, and the Post-Soviet Blockbuster: Nikita Mikhalkov and Aleksei Balabanov},
  author={Susan Larsen},
  journal={Slavic Review},
  year={2003},
  volume={62},
  pages={491 - 511}
}
In this article, Susan Larsen argues that the plot lines, aesthetic choices and marketing strategies of the four most commercially successful Russian films of the last decade—Nikita Mikhalkov’s Burnt by the Sun and Barber of Siberia and Aleksei Balabanov’s Brother and Brother-2—are shaped by anxieties about Russian national identity and cultural authority that these films articulate in gendered terms as threats to paternal bonds and fraternal communities. Aiming both to emulate and to displace… 
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TIE SOVIET FILM INDUSTRY had always relied on the state to finance and distribute its films. State-run film studios would produce the film, employ directors, actors and technical personnel, provide
Burnt by the Sun
Nikita Mikhalkov's film about the Stalin period has received wide attention inside and outside Russia, being shown at Cannes, winning an Oscar, and reaching cinemas worldwide. Mikhalkov is a fine and
63. Matizen also views the directors in the film as stand-ins for Balabanov
    Both print and on-line media provided extensive coverage of the search for survivors for weeks afterwards
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