Natchez Cannibal Speech1

@article{Kimball2012NatchezCS,
  title={Natchez Cannibal Speech1},
  author={Geoffrey Kimball},
  journal={International Journal of American Linguistics},
  year={2012},
  volume={78},
  pages={273 - 280}
}
  • Geoffrey Kimball
  • Published 1 April 2012
  • Linguistics
  • International Journal of American Linguistics
Between 1934 and 1936, Mary R. Haas did extensive fieldwork on the Natchez language, which was near death, with only two fluent speakers remaining. However, they both maintained a tradition of verbal art, and Watt Sam, with his extensive repertoire consisting of traditional Natchez tales and ones translated out of Creek and Cherokee, was a master storyteller. Mary Haas’s intensive efforts resulted in the collection of dozens of examples of Natchez oral literature. One of the features of this… 

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