Nasty, Brutish and in shorts? British colonial rule, violence and the historians of Mau Mau

@article{Lewis2007NastyBA,
  title={Nasty, Brutish and in shorts? British colonial rule, violence and the historians of Mau Mau},
  author={Joanna Lewis},
  journal={The Round Table},
  year={2007},
  volume={96},
  pages={201 - 223}
}
It was the summer of 1990 and my first Saturday morning in Africa. I had summoned my courage and rehearsed some basic Swahili before setting out alone on foot for central Nairobi. My goals were to avoid the ‘real’ Africa for the time being and simply purchase some fruits without being mistaken for a tourist. Twenty minutes later I was caught up in a mass riot and had run with a crowd from batonwielding police. These were Kenya’s multiparty demonstrations, the now legendary Saba Saba, and lives… 
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