Nasopharyngeal carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae at the completion of successful antibiotic treatment of acute otitis media predisposes to early clinical recurrence.

@article{Libson2005NasopharyngealCO,
  title={Nasopharyngeal carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae at the completion of successful antibiotic treatment of acute otitis media predisposes to early clinical recurrence.},
  author={Shai Libson and Ron Dagan and David Greenberg and Nurith Porat and Ronit Trepler and Alberto Leiberman and Eugene Leibovitz},
  journal={The Journal of infectious diseases},
  year={2005},
  volume={191 11},
  pages={
          1869-75
        }
}
OBJECTIVE We sought to investigate the role of Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP) nasopharyngeal (NP) colonization after successful antibiotic treatment (Rx) of acute otitis media (AOM) in recurrent AOM (RAOM). PATIENTS AND METHODS NP cultures were obtained from 494 (93%) of 530 patients at the end of antibiotic treatment (EOT). RESULTS At enrollment, middle ear fluid (MEF) cultures in 418 (79%) of 530 patients were positive for pathogens. At EOT, NP cultures in 208 (42%) of 494 patients were… 
Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae strains in children with acute otitis media– high risk of persistent colonization after treatment
TLDR
According to multivariate analysis, pneumococcal colonization after antibiotic therapy was significantly associated with shorter length of therapy in children with bilateral AOM and high persistent prevalence of antibiotic-resistant S.pneumoniae strains after unsuccessful bacterial eradication may presumably be regarded as a predisposing factor of infection recurrence.
Persistence of Pathogens Despite Clinical Improvement in Antibiotic-Treated Acute Otitis Media Is Associated With Clinical and Bacteriologic Relapse
TLDR
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TLDR
High nasopharyngeal carriage rates of S. pneumoniae were found in school children with AOM, with almost half of the strains being the vaccine-type, which supports the implementation of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines in Indonesia.
Effect of Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine on Nasopharyngeal Bacterial Colonization During Acute Otitis Media
TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
An increased load of SP in the nasopharynx was associated with RCP, viral coinfection, and presence of pneumococcal capsule in Vietnamese children aged less than 5 years.
Recent Advances in Otitis Media
TLDR
Optimal strategy for the prevention of AOM recurrences requires sterilization of the middle ear and eradication of nasopharyngeal carriage of otopathogens during antimicrobial therapy.
Characterization and Dynamics of Middle Ear Fluid and Nasopharyngeal Isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae from 12 Children Treated with Levofloxacin
TLDR
Children who had acute otitis media and were treated with levofloxacin were assessed for the emergence of fluoroquinolone-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and nasopharynx isolates were found to be susceptible without parC/E or gyrA/B mutations.
Culture-independent analysis of the bacteriology associated with acute otitis media in Indigenous Australian children
TLDR
T-RFLP analysis demonstrated significant differences between nasopharyngeal and ear discharge bacterial communities in Indigenous children with acute otitis media with perforation, suggesting divergence of the middle ear microbiome following secondary infection by canal flora.
Comparative Analysis of Microbiome in Nasopharynx and Middle Ear in Young Children With Acute Otitis Media
TLDR
It is found that the NW microbiome of children during healthy state or at baseline was more diverse than microbiome during AOM, although some bacteria species appear to differ in MEF than in NW, and at AOM no significant difference in microbiome diversity was found.
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