Nasal architecture of Paradolichopithecus arvernensis (late Pliocene, Senèze, France) and its phyletic implications.

@article{Nishimura2009NasalAO,
  title={Nasal architecture of Paradolichopithecus arvernensis (late Pliocene, Sen{\`e}ze, France) and its phyletic implications.},
  author={Takeshi Nishimura and Brigitte S{\'e}nut and Abel Prieur and Jacques Treil and Masanaru Takai},
  journal={Journal of human evolution},
  year={2009},
  volume={56 2},
  pages={
          213-7
        }
}

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