Nasal Structures in Old and New World Primates

@inproceedings{Maier1980NasalSI,
  title={Nasal Structures in Old and New World Primates},
  author={Wolfgang Maier},
  year={1980}
}
The structures of the rostral parts of the nose are not well known in primates. Most past information has been derived from studies of serial sections of various fetal stages, but unfortunately postnatal stages are normally skinned and cleaned to such a degree that all cartilage disappears. The only comprehensive studies on this topic were carried out by Wen (1930), who investigated all major primate taxa, and by Schultz (1935), who contributed to the knowledge of the Hominoidea. Recently Hofer… 
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