Narrative Review: Reversible Cerebral Vasoconstriction Syndromes

@article{Calabrese2007NarrativeRR,
  title={Narrative Review: Reversible Cerebral Vasoconstriction Syndromes},
  author={Leonard H Calabrese and David W. Dodick and Todd J. Schwedt and Aneesh Bhim Singhal},
  journal={Annals of Internal Medicine},
  year={2007},
  volume={146},
  pages={34-44}
}
Key Summary Points Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndromes (RCVS) are characterized by multifocal areas of constriction involving the cerebral arteries that resolve within days to weeks. Patients with RCVS often present with acute onset of severe headache (thunderclap headache) with or without neurologic symptoms and signs. RCVS can occur without identifiable cause, during pregnancy or the puerperium period, as an idiosyncratic response to certain medications or illicit drugs, and in the… 
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Indomethacin, either alone or in combination with emotional stress from pain, triggered or exacerbated an underlying predisposition to Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS).
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This work presents a 60-year-old male with sudden onset of severe headache, left-sided numbness and weakness, blurred vision, ataxia, nausea, and dyspnea, and presents RCVS, a little-understood, under-diagnosed condition that needs to be considered in patients presenting with headaches and neurologic deficits.
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Prognosis is excellent in the large majority of patients, and only 5% of patients experience a recurrence of RCVS, which involves avoidance of precipitating triggers and potentially short-term pharmacotherapy with calcium channel blockers for patients with associated neurologic complications.
Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome: A thunderclap headache-associated condition
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Clinicians must consider primary angiitis of the central nervous system because of its high rates of morbidity and mortality if left untreated, and this review provides an up-to-date account of RCVS.
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