Names of infamy: Tainted eponyms

@article{Vajda2015NamesOI,
  title={Names of infamy: Tainted eponyms},
  author={Frank J. E. Vajda and Stephen M. Davis and Edward Byrne},
  journal={Journal of Clinical Neuroscience},
  year={2015},
  volume={22},
  pages={642-644}
}
4 Citations
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